Tipping with a gift certificate

When tipping, if you received a coupon or gift certificate, how do you calculate the tip?

Tipping is always based upon the normal price of the good or service. If you get a coupon for 20% off, then tip on the original price.

From: findalink.net

Develop a Budget

Having your money down on paper (or spreadsheet) really helps. It’s different than just randomly spending. By knowing where those dollars are going, you’ll have more control over your money. 

From: mensplaybook.com

Book Friday: 13 Bankers

13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown is the best explanation yet for how the smart guys on Wall Street led us to the brink of collapse.

From: Getting Older Stinks

Credit cards and the Internet

Never use your credit card on the Internet if you’re not on an SSL (secure) server. Many web sites mention whether they’re secure. If you can’t determine the security of a site, check for a closed padlock icon in the lower-left corner of your screen. (The icon will often stay unlocked until you’ve opened the order page.)

From: bNet

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Budget for emergencies

Cars break down, pipes wear out and break, and kids get sick. Don’t forget to build an emergency fund to pay for these unexpected events.

From: theDigeratiLife.com

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Organizing your budget

After figuring out how much you have to budget, you need to spend every dollar on paper and give it a purpose before it even makes it into your checking account.

Your budget should go in the following order: Food, utilities, housing, transportation costs, clothing and health costs.

From: theDigeratiLife.com

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Raise your deductible

Deductibles on homeowners policies typically start at $250. By increasing your deductible to $500, you could save up to 12%.

From: ourfamilyplace.com

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Starting a budget

When beginning a budget don’t budget for “the perfect month” and don’t use your monthly average over the past year. A budget should reflect what is happening currently.

From: theDigeratiLife.com

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Try before you Buy

Try before you Buy: This goes a long way in helping to avoid the silly purchases of things you rarely or never use. Before you buy something, especially items with big price tags, borrow one, rent one or try one out before you plunk down the cash.

From: ourfamilyplace.com

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Improving fuel economy

Don’t run your vehicles if you aren’t driving. It takes less fuel to restart your engine than to let it idle for 10 seconds. Also avoid long warm-ups. Instead, drive gently until your engine reaches operating temperature.

From: mensfitness.com

Getting the whole picture when budgeting

When establishing a budget get the whole picture.  Start by collecting all checking account and credit card statements for the last year. 

Collect all cash receipts for the last month (or next month if you don’t do this).  Don’t forget cash spent on co-payments, mocha’s, haircuts, etc. 

Now collect all receipts for financial contributions to charity, including Girl Scout cookies, etc.  Collect all pay stubs, deposit receipts, etc.

From: way2hope.org

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Getting the whole picture when budgeting

When establishing a budget get the whole picture.  Start by collecting all checking account and credit card statements for the last year. 

Collect all cash receipts for the last month (or next month if you don’t do this).  Don’t forget cash spent on co-payments, mocha’s, haircuts, etc. 

Now collect all receipts for financial contributions to charity, including Girl Scout cookies, etc.  Collect all pay stubs, deposit receipts, etc.

From: way2hope.org

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Distinguishing between wants and needs

Distinguish between Wants and Needs: You will save a ton of money if you don’t mistake wants for needs.

Needs are pretty simple to identify–those items that are necessary to sustain: Shelter, food, clothing, transportation.

Wants are those things that enhance or possibly improve our family life. A car is a need.

From: ourfamilyplace.com

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Starting a budget

When putting together a budget the best way to get started is to put together a very basic list of your monthly income (i.e. your paycheck) and expenses.

 Just give it your best guess. Stick to listing things you can easily identify: rent, car payment, insurance, utilities (you get the picture). As time goes by you can add more detail.

From: personalbudgeting.com